"At the very least, I think you’ll come to agree with these takeaways:

  • The paid-up-front app market is smaller than it may appear.

  • Coverage from influential bloggers can drive more sales than an App Store feature.

  • Paid-up-front business models don’t generate sustainable revenues.

  • If you want to make “real money” from a paid-up-front app, your launch week has to be be a box-office smash.

  • Don’t launch your paid-up-front app at a reduced price. Demand for your app will likely never be higher again. Price it accordingly.

  • Sustainable revenue must come from other sources than the original app purchase, either from consumable in-app purchases, or from recurring subscriptions."

Posted
AuthorLorin Bute

"As Fairchild started to grow, employees began to leave the firm to launch new spin-off businesses. Many of these firms also grew quickly, inspiring other employees still working at the company.

[...]

The total impact of these businesses is staggering. The 92 public companies that can be traced back to Fairchild are now worth about $2.1 trillion, which is more than the annual GDP of Canada, India, or Spain. These companies also employ over 800,000 people."

Posted
AuthorLorin Bute

Apple's new programming language, Swift, took us all by surprise but luckily its very easy to pickup. If you want to learn Swift I recommend reading the the official book and the developer resources. For a quick "get to know" I suggest the following series of videos.

Posted
AuthorLorin Bute

Since Apple has announced Swift, their new programming language a lot of people, in a short amount of time, have come up with tutorials, short introductions and even complete apps built with it. I'd like to point you in another direction: a discussion between developers present at WWDC about what Apple presented there (development wise) and what the implications are for the future of apps. Here's an episode of the Debug podcast recorded at WWDC. If you like this episode I highly recommend subscribing to the podcast.

Debug is a casual, conversational interview show featuring the best developers in the business about the amazing apps they make and why and how they make them. On this episode Matt Drance of Bookhouse Software, Ryan Nielsen of Tumult, Daniel Jalkut of Red Sweater, and Jason Snell of Macworld join Guy and Rene to talk about Apple's WWDC 2014 keynote — the Swift programming language, Extensibility, Cloud Kit, Metal, and more.

Posted
AuthorLorin Bute